Raising Chickens in the City

Filed Under: Home repair    by: ITC

Interested in raising chickens in your city home?  You’re not alone.  Increasingly, people are finding the benefits of raising their own chickens worth the small hassle and expenses involved.    Your two biggest hurdles will likely be researching city ordinances, followed quickly by figuring out how to construct your chicken coops.  Let’s start with an overview of the benefits of raising your own poultry: Read more…

What’s an Energy Performance Certificate?

Filed Under: Home repair    by: ITC

There’s a program in the UK that looks like it might make it’s way here to the United States.   An energy performance certificate (EPC) is very similar to the “EnergyStar” stickers that we see here on major appliances like refrigerators and air conditioners.  However, instead of showing the efficiency of an appliance,  these certificates break down the energy efficiency of your home.  A similar certificate is available for commercial buildings, and is referred to as a commercial epc certificate.  In any case, both create a nice graphical depiction of not just the potential energy costs of a structure, but also some recommendations for improvement. Read more…

Getting the Location of Your Greenhouse Right

Filed Under: Home repair    by: ITC

Doing your planning upfront is a crucial task before taking on a home greenhouse project.  While the planning is important, building your own greenhouse doesn’t need to be complex or overly expensive. What type of greenhouse you should build should be determined by the overall space needed, available build sites, aesthetic considerations, and your budget.  No matter what your budget, however, you have to ensure that it’s a properly designed environment for the plants within. Check out this advice from South West Greenhouses, experts in the field: Read more…

What’s It Cost to Build a Garage?

Filed Under: Home repair    by: ITC

The cost of building a garage is driven by several factors that will be unique to the area that you live in, as well as the type and size of garage you choose to build. Going in chronological order, the first cost you will run into, assuming you already have a plan, is the preparation of the build site.   Typically you’ll need to pay for a some excavation and leveling of the ground where the foundation will go, followed quickly by the pouring of the foundation.  This cost varies based on local market prices, and the size of the garage’s foundation.   Read more…

Q&A: Becoming an Electrician in the UK

Filed Under: Electrical, Home repair    by: ITC

Q: For the last decade I have worked exclusively in the public sector.  While I’ve earned a good wage doing so, it’s not my passion, and I’m currently out of work.  I do find that I enjoy technically oriented tasks, and so I am very interested in working as an electrician in Liverpool. While I know that there is a process for training and certification, I’m unable to find helpful information on the web. I’m specifically looking for information on qualification, how long the training is,  how much it costs,  and if there’s an “apprenticeship period” I’ll have to cover off first. I’m also curious about the what a typical starting salary would be, and how much experience I would need before opening my own business. Read more…

Avoiding DIY Plumbing work with a little care

Filed Under: Home repair    by: ITC

When something goes wrong with your plumbing the results can be quite expensive, but with some DIY plumbing knowledge you can prevent these repairs from becoming necessary by taking care of your homes plumbing yourself.
First of all, when the end of autumn comes around you should disconnect all outside hoses around your home because it will stop pipes from freezing and you will not need to worry about water damage. On the other hand, you can take some time to purchase hose bibs that prevent freezing and not worry about this DIY plumbing prevention task. Read more…

4 Signs That it’s Time to Call for Help with Your DIY Project

Filed Under: Do it yourself, Home repair    by: ITC

1. Stress

Getting stressed out? Stress is a contributing factor to a lot of household injuries, and possible damages. For example, below is sign #2, –a direct contributing reason to get stressed out. Signs 3 and  4 are direct possible results of being too stressed out to do your project efficiently. So before you start freaking out, relax, and call a friend, or a professional, to lighten the load. Read more…

Top 10 Tackiest DIY Design Projects

Filed Under: Crafts, Do it yourself, Redecorating    by: ITC

10. Self-Designing a Room –With all Matching Furniture

When you purchase a complete bedroom furnishing set, your house will start looking like it’s a showroom. In addition to being boring, and extremely visually hefty, it’s an indication that you do not care about an individual sense of fashion since you have let others perform your decorating job, by letting some place such as a furniture store create it for you. Read more…

7 Ideas for Easy DIY Kitchen Remodeling

Filed Under: Do it yourself, Home repair    by: ITC

Whether you are looking to remodel your kitchen for yourself or for resale, there are a few helpful tips that can spice up your kitchen.

1. Check for coupons to Home Depot on auction sites like Ebay. Many times, you can find coupons that give you 10-20% off items. One caveat is that you need to check the feedback of the seller first to make sure they are honest about the coupons. Read more…

Basic DIY Plumbing: Toilet Trouble?

Filed Under: Home repair, Plumbing    by: ITC

I’ve been a plumber for several years and cannot tell you how many times I have walked into home improvement stores like Lowes or Home Depot only to find a customer, despondent about a leak that their toilet has sprung. As a plumber I would always suggest hiring a professional rather than doing it yourself, but in tough economic times, sometimes homeowners have to take matters into their own hands. Let me provide you with some insight into why your toilet might be malfunctioning.

Most toilet leaks come from a few common causes. Your toilet may suffer from one or it may have a combination of problems. One of the most common sources of leaks for toilets is the wax seal. The wax seal is a gasket made of wax that is on the bottom of a toilet, where it rests on the floor. Often, water on the floor or on the ceiling below the toilet is a sure sign that you have a problem with the wax seal. To fix this problem you need a new wax ring and T-bolts which you can find at your local hardware store.

First, turn off the water supply to the toilet. Next, flush the toilet and soak up as much of the water as possible from the toilet bowl itself. After you do that, loosen the T-bolts, disconnect the supply tubes, and lift the toilet off the floor. Position the toilet so that it is upside down and proceed to scrape off the wax seal from the bottom of the toilet as well as from the floor. After you have done this, place in the new wax seal and connect everything back up the way it was and install the new T-bolts. Turn the T-bolts 5 and 1/4 turns being careful not to over tighten the bolts. Turn the water on and flush the toilet.

Inspect the toilet, the floor, and the ceiling below for leaks. While labor intensive, performing this repair yourself would save you a couple of hundred dollars easily on plumber costs. The second most common leak source is caused by flowing over the overflow tube. If you have this problem, you will need a new fill valve. There are two types of fill valves. One has a big floating ball and arm, and the other has a float on the valve itself. Bother are interchangeable. You will need to buy a new fill valve at your local plumbing supply store.

Begin by turning off the water and disconnecting the splash tube. Flush the toilet and soak up all the water from the tank. Unscrew the nut under the fill valve on the outside of the toilet tank and remove the old fill valve. Install the new valve, making sure the height is correct. Put the valve into the hole in the bottom of the tank, tightening the nut on the outside as you go. Replace the supply tube and turn the water back on. Flush the toilet and check for leaks. Finally, take the tube that comes with the new valve and connect it from the valve to the overflow tube.

Another problem that frequently makes a toilet leak is a leak from the connection between the tank and the toilet bowl. In this case, you will need to purchase a new spud washer and new tank bolts. Occasionally, this problem arises from a cracked toilet bowl in which case you will need a new toilet. In order to determine this, the first thing that you need to do is to find out where the leak originates. Ask yourself if it leaks all the time or only when someone flushes the toilet. If it leaks all the time rather than only when someone flushes it, this is a sure sign that the tank or the bowl is cracked.

Examine each closely looking for hairline cracks where water may seep from. If you do find a crack, you are out of luck and will have to replace the toilet completely. Otherwise, this is probably a problem with the spud washer. To change this, you will once again need to shut off the water supply and flush the toilet. Next, loosen the bolts that connect the tank to the bowl. There are usually two or three of these depending on the model.

After that, remove the supply tube. Pick up the tank and remove it and the washer that is at the bottom of the tank. It is usually made of rubber and will have a spongy feel to it. Replace this washer with the spud washer you bought and place the tank back onto the bowl. Place the new bolts in and tighten gently, but do not over tighten. Replace the supply tube and turn the water back on. Again, check for leaks. Occasionally leaks originate from the supply tube. To fix this, you simply need to purchase a new supply tube and switch it out with the old one.

Another source of leaks in toilets is leaking inside the toilet from the tank to the bowl. The problem stems from the seal inside the tank called a flapper. To diagnose this problem, place a few drops of food coloring into the tank and wait for a couple of hours. After a couple of hours, check the bowl. If you see any of the food coloring in your toilet bowl, you can be assured that you have a leaky flapper.

To fix this, you will need to purchase a universal flapper. Most flappers are the same, although American Standard has their own design. Step one is to turn off the water to the toilet. Next, remove the old flapper by taking the chain off the lever and removing the flapper from two hooks at the bottom of the overflow tube that are attached to the flapper.

Install the new flapper and turn on the water. Try flushing the toilet. If it does not flush or does not flush with enough volume, adjust the chain length from the lever to the flapper. Test flush again. Hopefully with these tips, I have armed you with the knowledge to tackle the most common cause of toilet leaking and have hopefully saved you hundred of dollars in plumber fees.